A Favorite Vintage Kitchen Gadget: My Grandmother’s Wooden Corn Scraper

I think corn is a magic vegetable.  It is good on its own, unadulterated and on its humble cob: grilled, boiled, or just fresh off the stalk.  It is a marvelous added ingredient that brings both flavor and texture to muffins or savory breads, main courses like meat loaf, or hearty soups, chowders or risotto. It can star in a variety of salads or adorn a gourmet pizza.  Highlighting its flexibility, there are dozens of ways to showcase corn with all types of international flavors, from Italian to Peruvian to Southwestern to Scandinavian to African and more.

Salmon, Corn, Bruschetta and Snow PeasWe eat a lot of corn here at Glover Gardens.  It is my go-to quick vegetable when the main course requires intensive effort. I often cut it off the cob and pair it with peppers and tomatoes and give it a quick, hot sauté. I also like to use my antique corn scraper to get the most of the creamy “corn milk”, which both thickens and provides a richness to a corn-based dish.

Do you have a corn scraper? Here’s what mine looks like.

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This scraper was handed down from my grandmother to my Dad, and then to me when he decided to buy a new one.  I treasure it!  It is an antique but still very much in use, the best kind of inheritance. I think of my grandmother (“Mama”) and my Dad every time I use this wonderful tool.

Here’s a photo of a new corn scraper in action, from a company that sells them, Lem Products (see the link below).

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Image from Lem Products, one of the sellers of this wonderful little tool

The picture above is very much a styled image; the real thing in action looks very, very messy.  See all my denuded corn cobs below? And how creamy and juicy the output is? And how the corn is all over the countertop? I was documenting the family creamed corn recipe while I was making it for Thanksgiving, and got corn bits everywhere from my enthusiastic corn-scraping, including on the computer and the camera. I’m still finding little bits on the keyboard (this makes me smile.)

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So, if you like corn and don’t have a corn scraper, you need one! This handy little tool retails from various places for about $10 – $15, which makes for a great stocking stuffer for a cook or a foodie.  If you do have one, do you use it often? I’d like to know…

And finally, here’s a family recipe for creamed corn that we make with this marvelous tool: Best Creamed Corn Ever – Handed-Down and Upgraded Scratch Recipe from My Dad and Grandmother. Try it – you’ll love it!  This creamed corn is a rich, creamy dish that makes you nostalgic for the old days when life was simpler, people were kinder and you could borrow an egg from your neighbor, even if you never experienced any “old days” in that way.

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Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens

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