Aberdeen Countryside: “Ain’t She Stotter?”

Tunnock's Tea Cakes and Mrs Tilly's FudgeEarlier this week, I posted about my “snack food” vs. “junk food” epiphany in Aberdeen, in which I learned that I was a hypocrite during a break in a meeting.

What I neglected to do was to show you the Aberdeen I saw outside the window in that meeting.

I really, really like Aberdeen and want to share it with you, so here’s the picture I took from the window in the office building where our meeting was held.

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Verdant, bucolic, lush hills with farmhouses, pastures and cattle, right by an office center and busy highway – oh please don’t change, Aberdeen

And here’s another, from close by.

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Just across from a big hotel and busy office center, these cows graze languidly, perhaps knowing they are luckier than Texas cows

Aberdeen – ain’t she beautiful?  Or, in Doric, “Ain’t she stotter?”

Doric is the awesome traditional language of Aberdeen. I wish I had an awesome traditional language.

You’ll keep hearing about Aberdeen on these pages. I feel a kinship with it, which might be wishful thinking, or might have some roots in truth. My maiden name is Harvell, and my Dad always said we had English and “Scotch-Irish” heritage. Google tells me that the Harvell name came to England when the Normans did, way back in ’66, and that we may be related to the Hervies and de Hervis of Aberdeenshire and other parts of Scotland. I hope so! Or, “ah hope sae.”

” Aberdeen, ae day ah ll be back tae bide a while.”

For more Aberdeen musings from the Glover Gardens archives:

© 2018, Glover Gardens

 

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