Found Recipe: Swedish Apple Cake, or “Äppelkaka” 

This recipe was posted on a Swedish news website (SVT.se) and given to me by my mom’s neighbor after he made the cake – and I think I ate half of it myself.

The quote above is from a friend and colleague’s Facebook page, where she posted a picture of the marvelous apple cake she brought to our Thanksgiving potluck at work last Friday. She was happy to share the recipe when I asked (although she had to translate from Swedish, converting the measurements from deciliters), and added:

“It’s super easy to make, with a sort of a sugar cookie base with apples on top. I use Granny Smiths because of their sourness to contrast with the sweet cake.”

Swedish Apple Cake Cover
Photo credit to my colleague

This cake was terrific! The tart green apples balanced perfectly with the cookie-like base, and the texture contrast between the softness of the baked apples and the slight crunch of the crust was also very appealing.  It was a great dessert for our Thanksgiving lunch at work, and would be a perfect addition to any holiday table.

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • Rounded 3/4c sugar
  • Scant 1c flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 2 large apples or 4-5 small ones
  • 1 stick butter melted
  • Cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice

Cooking Instructions

Core and cut apples into 1/4″ slices. Toss in a bowl with cinnamon. I also add some nutmeg and allspice.

Whisk Eggs and sugar together. Then add flour and baking powder. Mix well. Will be a very thick batter consistency.

Take a spoonful or so of the melted butter and grease a round baking dish. A large shallow tart pan is best but I have also made in a large pie dish as well. Pour in batter and spread. (Tip: spin the pan on counter top to help the batter spread – it will be very thick)

Arrange the spiced apples on top and pour the remaining butter all over the top.

Bake at 350 for about 30 mins or until golden brown. If using a deeper pan, you may need to cover with foil if the top is browned but you can see that the batter is still wet in places.


The only thing that would make this cake better would be to serve it warm with some very rich vanilla ice cream or gelato. But who has room for that kind of decadence after a holiday meal? As made, I can convince myself that this is a healthy dessert because of the apples. Right?

 

 

Found Recipe – Pineapple Upside-Down Cake

I don’t bake very often, but sometimes, you just gotta.  That was me yesterday.

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Photo from Epicurious

The backstory: my Aunt-Mom was responsible for the dessert at Christmas dinner this past year and found a terrific recipe on Epicurious for Pineapple Upside-Down Cake.  It was originally published in Gourmet magazine in 2000, and her execution of the recipe was flawless.

It got rave reviews from the Grill-Meister:

so moist! so tasty! dense like a pound cake! love the brown sugar caramel-like glaze on top!

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The neon cake of the past

In addition to all that food-gushing, I like that the recipe calls for fresh pineapple and forgoes the neon blast of unnatural color and flavor from the maraschino cherries that always came to the upside down pineapple party in the past. I was curious about when that strange addition became the norm for its poor pineapple partner and stumbled on a terrific history lesson about pineapple upside down cakes (see the link in Resources below).

I had an opportunity yesterday to support a friend with a food contribution for a family gathering after a memorial service and thought this cake would be just right.  The Grill-Meister agreed, with a caveat:  please, please, please make two and keep one at home.  (The cake at Christmas was that good, remember: “so moist! so tasty! dense like a pound cake! love the brown sugar caramel-like glaze on top!”)

Along with the Grill-Meister, I can highly recommend this recipe.  Aunt-Mom, you done good!  

My upside-down cooking experience is shown below, and the recipe from Epicurious is at the bottom of the post.

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Start with fresh pineapple
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Melt butter in a cast-iron skillet
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Add the brown sugar and it makes a glaze
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Arrange the fresh pineapple atop the butter and brown sugar mixture
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The batter is pretty thick and you have to spoon it over the pineapple
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After baking but before upside-downing
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I was in a rush and didn’t have time to garnish, but actually love the homey look of it
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You can see the glazy-goodness and freshness of the pineapple – no neon maraschinos!
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The Grill-Meister and I had ours with coffee on the patio yesterday afternoon

Notes

If you make the recipe, you might want to look at the reviews from other (very enthusiastic) bakers.  My recommendations are to bake the cake for a little less time than recommended, use slightly less cardamom, and don’t skimp on the rum drizzle at the end.

The cake travels well and is a good one to bring to parties.  Epicurious says it serves 8, but I think it’s about double that number, because the cake is so rich that you can reasonably serve smaller pieces than this shown above.

Resources

 

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook