While her TV station flooded, a reporter stayed on air — and helped deputies rescue a driver – The Washington Post

Houston is under water and the rain is still coming down. So many stories are unfolding around us here in Southeast Texas as the floods interfere with every part of every life right now. Here’s one: a major news station, KHOU, flooded earlier today and is off the air.

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Photo from the Houston Chronicle

KHOU moved operations to the second floor when the water started to rise, then had a single field reporter carry their whole broadcast when that began to flood, too. Flooded in ourselves by the creek in our neighborhood, we still have power and cable TV.  I was watching KHOU several hours ago as reporter Brandi Smith identified a truck driver who was trapped on a flooded road, summoned a sheriff with a boat, and then covered the rescue.  She and photographer Mario Sandoval did an amazing job.

And then the station went dark.  Eerie.

Read more in this story in the Washington Post:  While her TV station flooded, a reporter stayed on air — and helped deputies rescue a driver.

As water poured into KHOU offices, reporter Brandi Smith and photographer Mario Sandoval stayed in the field despite the risks.

 

Your continued thoughts and prayers for the residents of Southeast Texas are appreciated.

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook

19 thoughts on “While her TV station flooded, a reporter stayed on air — and helped deputies rescue a driver – The Washington Post

  1. They didn’t go off the air. The ABC affiliate in Dallas continued to carry them via CBS Online. That was very cool considering that on a normal day they are competitors.

      1. CBS has an internet station that we get via Roku. That’s how we get your station. The reporter said something telling. Once she finished her reporting she had no place to go. Her work was flooded. So was her home. I know how she feels…

      2. We are suppose to get another eight inches or so. As I wrote in my yet to be published Storyteller, that would be okay if our power turbines, pumps and sewage system was fine. But, none of those things are at optimal working order. 25% of the pumps are down. Many of our power generators are on backup portables and our sewage system, if the six trucks are working full out, it will take 20 years to clean, repair and replace the system.

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