Haiku: Still Life on Wooden Door

Looking through some of my photos, I found a couple of an abandoned building in the Cline Ranch State Wildlife Area near Como, Colorado. I took them in February of this year, and forgot about them.

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The abandoned cabin is strangely appealing

I’m sure the horseshoe was reason I snapped the picture of the door below; it speaks to the hopeful mindset of the cabin’s inhabitant, whoever and whenever that was. When I looked closer and saw the dried flowers (put there by someone else later, right?), I knew I had to write a haiku about the still life they form together.

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I realized the haiku would make the most sense on the door itself. Enjoy.

Wooden Door Still Life Haiku

Click here for another post with lots more photos: Cline Ranch State Wildlife Area. But beware, if you love a winter scene, these photos will stir your wanderlust and you may find yourself searching for discount airfare for Colorado in February…

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook

“Frank-biscus” Blooms! Just in Time for Harvey

A couple of days ago, I shared a lovely hibiscus haiku written by my cousin’s wife in the wake of my Dad’s death, which accompanied a hibiscus. We named it “Frank-biscus” to honor him.

We have an abundance of hibiscus at Glover Gardens, and I used some of them in the post instead of highlighting Frank-biscus, which hadn’t yet bloomed after being re-potted.

Yesterday, as Hurricane Harvey was sending advance rainstorms to herald his impending arrival, Frank-biscus opened up a beautiful, bright pink blossom!

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To me, this was a reminder from God – during all of the fearsome ravaging brought by the hurricane – that nature is also beauty.

Here’s the haiku again, now properly paired with Frank-biscus.

your much-beloved dad
like this hibiscus flower
blossomed love and life

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook

Death is Life-Affirming: Hibiscus Haiku

Death is life-affirming.

Family gathers ’round when a loved one dies, sharing memories and telling stories, all a reminder both of the value of the life of the lost one and the interconnectedness of those who remain. We experienced this at Glover Gardens recently when my Dad died, rejoicing in the togetherness of family and friends even while we mourned together. In addition to their continual prayers and love, my cousin’s wife brought a gift to our informal celebration of Dad’s life, a live and blooming hibiscus, with a heartfelt haiku.

your much-beloved dad
like this hibiscus flower
blossomed love and life

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Lucy, my Aunt-Mom and Dad’s widow, took this beautiful picture

I’ve posted before about how we love love love both hibiscus and haiku here at Glover Gardens; this gift was as appropriate and welcome as a hug to smooth a hardship – and so life-affirming! A quick little poem, at the second grade level (I couldn’t resist):

I have a wonderful cousin
who has a wonderful wife.
She wrote a hibiscus haiku
to celebrate Dad’s life.

 

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A white Texas Star hibiscus, blooming for the first time on Dad’s death day

Find more about Dad here.

And here’s a tour through our hibiscus flowers (also shared in this previous post).

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Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook

~ with help from Marsha (haiku) and Lucy (cover picture) and Dad (inspiration) ~

It’s Owl-Right (plus a haiku)

A recent trip to Scotland had many surprises, including a wonderful interlude with a couple of owls.  Yes, owls. And no, it wasn’t on a walkabout in the verdant Scottish countryside – it was smack-dab in the middle of Edinburgh’s Royal Mile.

The beautiful and wise-looking creatures were surveying a small crowd outside of Gladstone’s Land, a museum run by the National Trust for Scotland.

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Check out those eyes!

The human handler for the owls looked wise, too, and shared stories and myths about them, which piqued my interest.

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Back at home, curious, I realized that the only thing I knew about owls was that it really bugged my mom when a family of them made a nest in the rafters of our home at the beach when I was growing up (I thought it was kindof cool, but I didn’t have to deal with the situation).  I did some Googling, and learned that owls have inspired myths and legends for centuries on several continents. Bad stuff like stealing babies, seeing into the darkness of the human soul, being a harbinger of death and doom … and good stuff, too, such as clairvoyance, bringing enlightenment and truth through dreams, symbolizing wisdom and strength. Looking at the closeup of one of the owls I met that day in Edinburgh, I can see why they’ve captured imaginations through the ages. There is an undeniable sense of mystery and knowing in those eyes, as though she actually could see right through our souls to the other side.

She-Owl: a Haiku

soaring through the skies 
holding secrets, truths and lies
in amber-wise eyes

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Resources

I didn’t have time to visit the Gladstone’s Land museum, but it is on the list for a return trip to Edinburgh.

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The Gladstone’s Land Museum is situated in one of the oldest buildings on Edinburgh’s Royal Mile – it’s on the list for the next trip

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook

haiku: hungry hummingbird

hello, hummingbird!
drink up before your journey;
~ thanks for stopping by ~

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This hungry little beauty zoomed up to the feeder at Little House in the Rockies within two minutes of my filling it, and then posed for me for a moment.  The early bird gets the bright red go-juice! Migration is just a month away for this Black-Chinned Hummingbird.

Mindfulness is so easy in the quiet of a mountain cabin.

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook