Lonely Future / How It Be, According to The Storyteller

Glover Gardens is not a political blog, but the publisher (that would be me) does have opinions.

The post that I’m linking to here from The Storyteller blog really resonated with me. While its author wasn’t specific about which “regulatory roll backs” he was referring to (see below), I instantly went to my environmental concerns. Here’s part of what he said:

I call it this picture, “Lonely Future.” It’s about all the constant regulatory roll backs of the current United States leadership. No people. No cars. Just weirdly colored skies.
It’s not a Sunday picture, Well. It is. Sorta. A long time back I use to publish “Experimental Sunday.” It was a sort of predictable Sunday feature when I posted images that I was… (click to read more )

Again, this is not a political blog, but I don’t think anything about protecting our environment and the animals and people who live in it should be political. How can caring for something that benefits us all be a partisan issue?

Perhaps I’m too simple and idealistic.

Perhaps I’m not smart enough to understand how short-term economic or material gains could outweigh long-term benefits for the health of our ecosystem and all of its components.

Maybe there’s some greater good that I can’t grasp about relaxing regulations against pollutants.

Maybe I’m an idiot to feel that the loss of even one more endangered species puts the world as a whole in a little more danger.

Maybe.

Or maybe not.

Anyway, the dystopian nature of the artistic Lonely Future picture from The Storyteller took me to this place, and now I’ve pulled you into it with me. But I stick by my assertion that Glover Gardens in not political. Look for more stories about memories and food tomorrow. Or a haiku. You seem to like my haiku.

Source: How It Befrom The Storyteller Blog

Memorial Day, Andy Rooney, the Thankful Foreigner, and Blowin’ in the Wind

11263025_10206545505667097_3146148380970970297_nIt’s Memorial Day here in the U.S. The day we remember those who served in our military and did not live to come home.

Andy Rooney Rethinks Memorial Day

I saw a thoughtful piece by the late commentator Andy Rooney that’s worth sharing, Rooney Rethinks Memorial Day. He said:

Remembering doesn’t do the remembered any good, of course. It’s for ourselves, the living. I wish we could dedicate Memorial Day, not to the memory of those who have died at war, but to the idea of saving the lives of the young people who are going to die in the future if we don’t find some new way – some new religion maybe – that takes war out of our lives.

That would be a Memorial Day worth celebrating.”

I wholeheartedly agree. It makes me want to sing: “the answer, my friend, is blowing in the wind”. The whole clip is worth watching.

A Hummingbird’s Salute

For a Memorial Day photo, here’s a hummingbird and our flag. Just because. The hummingbirds have been happy with our feeder over this Memorial Day weekend here at Little House in the Rockies. Perhaps that tiny bird is saluting our fallen men and women by posing for me in front of the flag.

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The Thankful Foreigner

Another remembrance is this post from the Glover Gardens archive about a young French man who grew up near Normandy and appreciated the D-Day sacrifice: by the Allies: The Thankful Foreigner: An Award-Winning Essay from a Millennial. It’s a bit of a read, but a sweet little story and quite apropos on Memorial Day.

Blowin’ in the Wind

I’ll leave you with these lyrics from Bob Dylan, so very much in line with the theme from Andy Rooney’s commentary.

How many roads must a man walk down
Before they can call him a man?
How many seas must a white dove sail
Before she sleeps in the sand?
How many times must the cannon balls fly
Before they’re forever banned?

The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind
The answer is blowin’ in the wind

How many years can a mountain exist
Before it is washed to the sea?
How many years can some people exist
Before they’re allowed to be free?
How many times can a man turn his head
And pretend that he just doesn’t see?

The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind
The answer is blowin’ in the wind

How many times must a man look up
Before he can see the sky?
How many ears must one man have
Before he can hear people cry?
How many deaths will it take ’til he knows
That too many people have died?

The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind
The answer is blowin’ in the wind

The answer is blowin’ in the wind

Blowin’ in the Wind lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Audiam, Inc
© 2018 Glover Gardens

Haiku: A Room of Her Own

This artist’s studio, a room preserved as it was at one time at the Museum of Montmartre in Paris, inspires me. I knew when I first saw it that I wanted a room like this.

a room of her own
(where the self can be known)
is a treasure

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More to come on this topic as the room of my own becomes a reality.

© 2018, Glover Gardens

Haiku: Girl Power

she’s heading skyward
ambitions escalating
capable and strong

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I snapped a picture of this anonymous woman climbing up a real corporate “ladder”, and she became a symbol, a photographic talisman to honor and protect all young women who seek a meaningful career. Here’s to your journey upward and onward; know that you carry with you the hopes and dreams of all who came before.

Copyright 2018, Glover Gardens

St. Francis Prayer of Peace for a World That Needs It

Hello world, friends, family and neighbors: I wish you peace, love, happiness, serenity, interesting hobbies, low blood pressure and job security.

I’m not Catholic but I have a spiritual crush on St. Francis – how can you not love the patron saint of animals???!!! I ran across the St. Francis peace prayer today, and it is too beautiful not to share.

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By Anonymous – da web, FAL, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6382528

I hope to one day embody even a small portion of this kind of goodness, optimism, acceptance and love.

Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.
Where there is hatred, let me sow love.
Where there is injury, pardon.
Where there is doubt, faith.
Where there is despair, hope.
Where there is darkness, light.
Where there is sadness, joy.

O Divine Master,
grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled, as to console;
to be understood, as to understand;
to be loved, as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive.
It is in pardoning that we are pardoned,
and it is in dying that we are born to Eternal Life.

Isn’t that lovely? Although it turns out that St. Francis didn’t write this beautiful supplication…the first record of it is in the early 1900s, and the syntax doesn’t match the dialect from the 1200s when Friar Francis lived (see this article). But the prayer was thematically accurate, according to Wikipedia: “As a friar later summarized the relationship between the prayer and St. Francis: ‘One can safely say that although he is not the author, it resembles him and would not have displeased him.'”

And hey, does it matter who wrote it if it is meaningful? And it is meaningful.

Because of my crush, the Grill-Meister gave me a St. Francis bird feeder some years ago, and we keep it full.

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I love love love love love watching the birds, especially the cardinals, enjoy the feeder; it is an investment in peace, love, happiness, serenity and low blood pressure!

For my birthday in 2014, the Grill-Meister commissioned a beautiful work of art representing Glover Gardens in which our St. Francis and my beloved cardinals are featured – see below.

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Original art created by Shannon O’Donnell

The artist said, in her Facebook post of the painting:

This piece was commissioned by Tom for his wife, Kim. He wanted a painting that brought together all of the special pieces they have in their yard — a statue/bird feeder of St. Francis, the wrought iron heart/cross with a butterfly, Kim’s favorite flowers (blue irises), her favorite birds (cardinals), their saguaro cross on the tree with the turquoise center, the “Blessings” sign hanging from the branch, and their bird house (tucked in the trees). I wanted St. Francis to almost “come alive” — like a haven for all the little animals. And as I thought about St. Francis and the birdseed, all I could think of was that it wouldn’t be complete without a little squirrel!!!

Isn’t that wonderful / peaceful / serene? Find the artist here: Paintings by Shannon Gurley O’Donnell. She rocks, and exemplifies the St. Francis frame of mind. You should check her out!

Life is good.

Copyright 2018, Glover Gardens

 

beth and bella and bree and brielle (an amazing poem by a very wise 6th grader)

I just read an awesome poem by a friend and former colleague’s daughter, published in the Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) Navigator online blog.  Source: beth and bella and bree and brielle.

beth and bella and bree and brielle

went down to the park (to relax one day)

and beth found a firefly that flew to the sky; forward to tomorrow and back again to yesterday that made her run as fast as the wind, and

bella ate some wonderful fruit that made her feel like she could float;

and bree laid down in the soft, summer grass and watched the leaves sway and dance: and

brielle climbed a tree that was as tall as forever and its view stretched out to the green studded meadows and back to her home.

Whatever we think, whatever we were taught to believe will keep on changing with the world’s scenery.

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Wow! This beautiful, gentle, tranquil and philosophical poem is rich with imagery, illustrative of the concept and value of mindfulness, and fills me with hope. Are you with me?

Click here to read the poem online and navigate to other contributions.

Copyright belongs to Brielle Burns, a 6th grader from Texas

The Wheel – Beautiful Image and Thoughtful Post from The Storyteller Blog

I would really like to blog more often, but time is at a premium. However, there is always incredible material from other bloggers that can and should be shared. Here’s today’s contribution, a lovely photo and quiet couple of stories that have been woven together in one of my favorite blogs.

“The wheel is turning and you can’t slow down, You can’t let go and you can’t hold on You can’t go back and you can’t stand still, If the thunder don’t get…

Source: The Wheel | STORYTELLER

Image and story by Ray Laskowitz

Eating “As Low on the Food Chain as You Can”

Warning – this might be a rant.

Many moons ago, back when I still listened to AM radio, I heard a physician on a call-in show called “Ask the Doctor” make a pronouncement about food and healthy eating, and it stuck with me:

Eat as low on the food chain as you can.

Meaning:

  • know what you’re eating, where it came from, and what went into it
  • be a locavaore! eat fresh, locally grown foods as much as possible
  • limit processed foods with “fake” or altered ingredients (anybody seen the latest news about sugar substitutes lately?- it ain’t good)
  • make dishes from scratch when you can
  • avoid foods that are pre-cut, pre-marinated, pre-mixed, pre-packaged, pre-anything (don’t even get me started on the topic of meat with saline solution injected)

The radio doctor’s arguments were based on simple truths: the more hands that touch your food and the more processing it undergoes, the more likely you are to encounter bacteria, unhealthy and unnecessary additives or preservatives, or the loss or degradation of vital nutrients.

I really believe in this philosophy, and that’s why I loathe fast-food restaurants and love farmers’ markets and locally-owned, non-chain establishments. It doesn’t matter if they’re famous like Pike Place Market in Seattle or the shops on the Rue de Martyrs in Paris, or humble little mom and pop establishments, or small-town markets like our (surprisingly large and popular) Tomball Farmers Market.

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A produce vendor on the Rue de Martyrs in Paris (love that street!)

That’s why I make my own chicken, vegetable, beef and seafood stock with bones, shells or vegetable trimmings rather than buying canned stock and freeze it until the need arises. Right now, all I have is vegetable stock.

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“Spicy Veg Stock” in my freezer, waiting to be needed – maybe for tortilla soup

That’s why I use real butter and eschew margarine, and make my own marinades, and peel my own carrots rather than buying those bogus, whittled-down “baby” carrots.

carrots
There’s no such thing as a “baby” carrot

That’s why I have vegetable and herb gardens most years.

Peppers
A very late harvest of peppers last winter

That’s why I love it when the Grill-Meister makes his marvelous pizza dough from scratch and we throw on our own unique mix of ingredients rather than ordering from Domino’s or Papa John’s or one of those other cardboard and cheese vendors. The pizza below was a delicious Glover Gardens creation: the Grill-Meister’s smoked chicken with white onions, goat cheese and red pepper flakes popped into the pizza oven for about 8 minutes, and then topped with fresh grape tomato slivers and dabs of fig jam from Just Pure Flavors, one of my favorite vendors at our local farmers market.

That “eat low on the food chain” philosophy is why I will never, ever eat fast-food fried chicken again in my natural lifetime. But the other reasons are the PTSD from the last time I ate fast-food fried chicken – and the food poisoning, with its subsequent dehydration, fainting, and concussion from hitting a ceramic tile floor.  It was 24 years ago, but it’s still really too soon to talk about it…

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Photo from Popeye’s Facebook page

After all these declarations, I’m not as pure as I might sound, though; I have embraced a few notable exceptions to this philosophy, which I will share in other posts.  I think I can defend all of them, but you can be the judge. Also, I haven’t made the logical transition to vegetarian that you might expect after reading a rant like this, but I do really love vegetables and am always interested in the recipes posted in the vegetarian blogs I follow (you know who you are).

Resources:

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Photo from Buzzfeed article via blogger.com

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook