Dad is gone…and still our hearts are full

the chair by the fire is empty
Dad won’t be here to read Luke 2
we feel his loss deeply
and still our hearts are full

the stocking for Dad is empty
he won’t be bringing the shrimp dip
everything’s different without him
and still our hearts are full

they’re full because God loves us
they’re full because He lived
they’re full because Dad’s healed now
they’re full because Christmas is

Dad is gone…and still our hearts are full

img_1477
Manger scene ornament hand-painted by my aunt
fullsizeoutput_1d98
Last year’s stockings, the last outing for Dad’s

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens

 

 

In the Christmas Mood! Holiday Tips from Colleagues include a Hot Chocolate Bar, a Board Game and Christmas Jazz

We’re in the Christmas mood here at Glover Gardens, and some of my colleagues have helped us get that way…

There was a hot chocolate bar at our work party last week, and my colleague who organized the party urged me to get there early and take pictures “for the blog”. Sweet!

fullsizeoutput_1d7a.jpeg

The bar was a great idea and we may do something similar here on the 28th when we have our family Christmas. The hot chocolate was in a big crock pot, and there were all kinds of goodies to drizzle, dollop or adorn the sweet, steaming goodness. (Not pictured – whipped cream!)

Beyond enjoying a meal and the hot chocolate together, our little work party during lunch one day last week was really fun! Calling it a “wamily” (work family), the crackerjack team of party planners had organized activities that made the event a wonderful bonding experience.   Our recreation during the celebration included decorating ornaments, a hilarious set of contests (I actually won the one in which you have one minute to draw a snowman on a paper plate on top of your head because the judge was impressed that I wrote “snowman” in cursive legibly) and playing board games together in small groups. One of my colleagues brought a new game, Codenames, and we were all instantly enamored. I ordered one right away for Glover Gardens, and Santa might have given a couple as gifts (shhhhhh!).

codenames-01

Another colleague, knowing how we feel about jazz here at Glover Gardens, sent a text to me one evening with a link to the Jazz at Lincoln Center Big Band Holidays performance (led by Wynton Marsalis) on YouTube suggesting that my family would enjoy it. Love it!

This music will definitely put you in the Christmas mood.

Thanks to my colleagues for the great tips!

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens

 

Best Creamed Corn Ever – Handed-Down and Upgraded Scratch Recipe from My Dad and Grandmother

Holiday dinners are about tradition, traditional recipes and taste memories that carry meaning beyond anything our taste buds can comprehend; here are some from my family’s table:

  • The yeast rolls from “Mema’s” recipe, almost the basis for a religion (you know I’m right).
  • The stuffing/dressing. It.Must.Be.Right. There’s a whole, as-yet unpublished story about the evolution of the dressing in my family, a North-South conflict that threatened my parents’ marriage until it was resolved. I’ll come back to that later, but before Christmas, because I promised a dressing devotee that I’d document it.
  • That green bean casserole that no one should like because it has all those extra-processed ingredients – hello, “French”-friend onions from a can!!!???  Someone in my family always manages to sneak that dish in, and they all look at me to see if I will break into food-snob mode and castigate them. This year, I relaxed my standards and had a few bites at Thanksgiving.  Surprisingly, the world didn’t stop spinning on its axis. Yet.
  • The faux cranberry-something in a can (another anathema to me, but hey, some of my loved ones swear by it, and so does Rick Bragg). To counter this abomination, I actually make cranberry relish from scratch, and I’m usually the only one who eats it. I’m ok with that.
  • Sweet potatoes with marshmallow topping (where o’ where did that come from???)
  • The fresh creamed corn made from a 75-year old recipe.

That last bit, the creamed corn, is the subject of today’s post. This is serious business. My Dad always made my grandmother Mema’s creamed corn (once she was finished making it; she’s been doing Thanksgiving for the angels since 2000). Dad earnestly took Mema’s recipe and made it his own. The documentation of her recipe is below, from a school project my aunt undertook years ago.

fullsizeoutput_198c

My aunt’s notes below the instructions are a testimonial:

This was the way I had eaten corn all my life until I married.  It was a big let-down to try canned cream corn and I have made it a point to use this recipe often.”

I wanted to get the latest take on this, so in 2015, I asked Dad, via email:

Dad – I found Mema’s recipe for creamed corn (from Aunt Lynda).  It used corn, butter, water, salt and pepper.  I think you said you used cream instead, and white pepper. Is that right?

He was immediately forthcoming, as this was an important issue in the family:

Kim, last year I followed mom’s recipe to the letter and I’m sure you remember it had too much butter.  This year I followed my recipe with just a lot of white pepper, maybe a tablespoon of butter and less than a cup of water.  Much better.

Dad is gone now. I’m having a hard time believing that he will not be bringing creamed corn every year, or ever again. Last year at Thanksgiving (2016), because of an illness, he was out of the hospital but on a stomach feeding tube, and couldn’t eat – or even taste – anything, but he still made his famous creamed corn. Did I mention that this creamed corn is from scratch, starting with fresh corn on the cob and never, ever frozen or canned – don’t even think about it!

fullsizeoutput_1991
Dad’s last creamed corn, a dish he made by feel and memory because he couldn’t taste it. It went fast.
Dad at the Stove
Dad in 2015 in my kitchen

Dad was an amazing optimist; taking a bit of every dish at our 2016 Thanksgiving table of bounty, he made a to-go container that he froze for a time in the future when he would be able to eat again. That time didn’t come. He left us in June of this year, never having gotten clearance to eat normally again, never thawing and enjoying that belated Thanksgiving feast. I miss him every day. But I feel his presence every day, too.

But here I go digressing again. Let’s do the recipe! This year, I made the creamed corn myself for the first time in advance of our 2017 Thanksgiving celebration. Hoping not to create a family controversy, I made some minor modifications to update the classic recipe while preserving its simple elegance. Since no one noticed, I think I’m in the clear. The major differences were that I used cream instead of water, added a bit more of a savory taste with a small amount of sautéed leeks, and the secret ingredient – ground nutmeg.

Using the vintage corn scraper handed down from my father and grandmother, and with their recipe notes as a guide, I was deep in the heart of family taste memories when I made this dish.

Harvell Family Creamed Corn (serves 8-10)

Ingredients

  • 8 large cobs of fresh corn
  • 1 tbsp. butter
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced and chopped leeks
  • 1/4 heavy cream
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. white pepper
  • 1/8 tsp. ground nutmeg or about 50 scrapes of fresh nutmeg (preferred)
  • 1 green onion, very thinly sliced

Cooking Instructions

Shuck the corn cobs and wash off any stray silk.  Use a corn scraper or knife to cut all of the kernels from the cobs, collecting them in a large bowl.

Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat, then add the leeks and sauté for 5-7 minutes until they are soft and translucent. Add the corn and “corn milk” and continue to sauté on medium for 7-10 minutes until the mixture is thickened and the corn is soft.  Add the cream, salt and white pepper and cook for about 5 more minutes until the cream has thickened.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, if necessary.

Serve hot and garnish with the sliced green onion.


Note: The creamed corn will keep for several days in the fridge, so you can make it early. It won’t seem like a large amount, but it is very rich, so a small serving is just right.

 

fullsizeoutput_197c.jpeg
Start with fresh corn – don’t cut corners on this recipe
fullsizeoutput_197e
A corn scraper / cutter is the best way to get it off of the cob, but you can also use a knife; that’s my antique corn scraper above.
fullsizeoutput_197f
Beware – the scraping process makes a big, satisfying mess!
fullsizeoutput_1981
Sauté the chopped leeks in butter
fullsizeoutput_1982
The leeks should be soft and translucent before adding the corn
fullsizeoutput_1983
The corn gets sautéed for 7-10 minutes
fullsizeoutput_1984
Add the cream and continue to cook until the mixture has thickened
fullsizeoutput_1986
Nutmeg is the secret ingredient; you can use ground nutmeg, or grind fresh nutmeg using a microplane (it’s much, much better this way!)

The end product is a rich, creamy dish that makes you nostalgic for the old days when life was simpler, people were kinder and you could borrow an egg from your neighbor, even if you never experienced any “old days” in that way.

fullsizeoutput_198b

Check out my post about the usefulness of a corn scraper here, and check out this other blog for the deep-dive into the mechanics of the use of a scraper. And let me know if you make the Harvell Family Creamed Corn for your holiday table.

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens

Happy New Year!

It’s New Year’s Eve!  I’m looking forward to 2017 and all of the opportunities, challenges, connections and blessings it will bring.  And I have to acknowledge that one of the big opportunities and blessings for me in 2016 was sharing a few thoughts, recipes and haikus with you in this blog – and the interactions and connections that spawned.  Thank you!

There’s no time to create a compelling post at the moment – the Christmas tree’s undoing beckons!- so I will wish everyone a safe and happy celebration tonight, and simply repost a New Year’s Day Brunch menu from last year.

Pampas Grass Cocktail
The Pampas Grass is a very light sparkler to brighten up your New Year’s Eve or brunch

My recommended New Year’s Brunch Menu (which can also be a lovely New Year’s Eve menu if you’re having a party):

I got all into New Year’s traditions last year and wrote about the traditions that accompany it – click here if you’d like to read the full post.

Happy New Year!  And don’t forget to be safe.

 

Copyright 2016, Glover Gardens Cookbook

 

 

Haiku: Ode to My Christmas Tree

I love to decorate the Christmas tree each year and remember the where, when and who of each ornament. We have tinsel from my paternal grandmother’s tree dating back to the 50s, kitschy baubles we picked up to remember family holidays, ornaments from my mother-in-law’s native Germany, handmade treasures from craftsy folks and schoolchildren, and gifts from years and years of stuffed stockings and generous colleagues.  Decorating a Christmas tree together and talking about the ornaments is almost like a family’s oral history.  I woke up this morning with this haiku about the tree in my head.

Ode to My Christmas Tree

Decorated, you
  are evergreen memories,
  ghosts of Christmas Past.

Found Recipe: A New Holiday Sweet Potato Favorite

We love our holiday food classics here at Glover Gardens, but it is also fun to mix it up a bit.  At Thanksgiving this year, my Aunt-Mom (there’s a story for another time) did just that with these wonderful sweet potato “stacks” she found in Cooking Light.  Yum!  And look how attractive they are.

fullsizeoutput_360.jpeg
These sweet potatoes were just right – not sweet and just the right savory level.  And the serving size is excellent.  Photo by Frank Harvell (AKA my Dad).

My Aunt-Mom says she doesn’t like to cook but is really, really good at finding great new recipes.  This one can be found online at Cooking Light’s site here:  Sweet Potato Stacks with Browned Butter.

1611p127-sweet-potato-stacks-with-sage-browned-butter
Photo for Cooking Light online by Jennifer Causey

 

Baking with Myrna Loy and William Powell

Christmas Eve is tomorrow!  Today’s the day that I stay home, get caught up on wrapping gifts, and bake, bake, bake.

I have a small TV in the kitchen, and it is almost always tuned to Turner Classic Movies (first choice) or the TV Food Network (distant second).  Movie classics I first saw with my Dad 30+ years ago (when they were already old!) keep me company while I turn out the family classic recipes.

myrnaloy-v1-f1_113020161047I’m in luck today because Myrna Loy is the Star of the Month and the lineup presents her in back-to-back features with William Powell, all day long.  Woohoo!  (It’s the little things.)  Did you know that these two stars made 14 movies together?  I have always been a fan of the Thin Man series but didn’t realize how many other times they were paired up, mostly for comedies, but with a few dramas in the mix.  They’ve started already this morning with a crime drama, Manhattan Melodrama, which also stars Clark Gable.  Heaven.

mmelo21

I’m all giddy because my mother-in-law is hosting the annual Christmas Eve appetizers and stocking fest and I’m only responsible for desserts, a great balance since the Christmas Day shindig and feast is here is Glover Gardens.  My Friday kitchen lineup is below.

Raspberry-Nut Christmas Bars, which are my mother-in-law’s favorite, a really nice combination of salty and sweet.

Raspberry Nut Christmas Bars

I like to serve these Raspberry-Nut bars at holiday parties with decadent partners, like drams of Chambord (raspberry liqueur).

Cranberry-Walnut Chocolate-Covered Cookie Mountains, luscious chocolate-chip cookies made decadent by dipping them in chocolate post-baking, a close second in my mother-in-law’s estimation.  (Recipe not published yet, but maybe after today’s batch.)

The dressing.  Even though we aren’t having turkey this Christmas, the dressing is a MUST.  It could be a meal in itself.  I’m going to try to finalize the recipe and publish it.  Family recipes that are made with muscle memory because you’ve done it dozens of times are the hardest to document, don’t you think?  Like trying to tell someone how to tie a shoe without demonstrating it.

If I have time, these truffles from The Irreverent Kitchen blog.  Don’t they look good?  Alicia, who publishes the blog, says they are really easy.  And it looks like fun.  I think I might be able to wangle a little help with them from the millennials who have decamped at Glover Gardens for the duration of the Christmas holiday.  (We are filled with joy to have a full house this year.)

img_3435
Photo from The Irreverent Kitchen

What are you doing today?

Copyright 2016 Glover Gardens Cookbook