Glover Gardens Holiday Menu Classics

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We’re without the next-gen here at Glover Gardens on Christmas Day 2017, so we’re throwing tradition to the wind and going out to a restaurant. Turkeys will not bake, smoke or fry here. Rolls will not rise, cranberries will not pop-pop-pop, and gravy will not be de-lumped.  None of our prized sides will compete for best in show on heavy-laden plates. Our collection of Christmas salt and pepper shakers will not adorn an over-decorated holiday table (for context, see our post Setting a Beautiful Table – Whimsical Christmas) . SIGH.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy our recipes at your own holiday table! Here is a Glover Gardens holiday recipe compendium, starting with breakfast.

Celebrate the Day!

Make-ahead is the name of the game with the one-two punch of Scotch Eggs and Sweet Potato biscuits for breakfast on Christmas morning.  Find the recipes and their stories here: Found (and edited) Recipe: Scotch Eggs and Sweet Potato Biscuits: Family History, Love on a Plate.

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Scotch Eggs
Sweet Potato Biscuits
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Scotch Eggs with Sweet Potato Biscuits
Together, a perfect (and easy) Christmas breakfast

Or you can make one of our breakfast casseroles; see Breakfast Club Casseroles: Ham & Green Chilé Strata and Broccoli & Mushroom Frittata.

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Our millennials can make a mean breakfast quiche, which would be great on Christmas morning: What’s for Breakfast? Roasted Tomato, Mozzarella, and Spinach Quiche.

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Hors d’Oeuvres

We’ve made the mistake in past years of having too many appetizers and getting full by turkey time, but the one appetizer we always have on holidays is house-made smoked salmon.  Get the recipe here: Tom’s Smoked Salmon.

Tom's Smoked Salmon
This salmon makes a welcome appearance for parties and holiday meals at Glover Gardens.

Another very simple and incredibly beautiful appetizer is the Rosemary Wreath. Read about it here: Rosemary Wreath Appetizer Platter .

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The Main Event

We usually have two turkeys to ensure plenty of leftovers (turkey gumbo is the best!) and have tried a variety of recipes in the past.  The Grill-Meister will do one outside (usually smoked) and I’ll go the baked route.  For several years, I’ve used the spatchcocking approach, and the turkey is always very moist. Spatchcocking maximizes the skin surface for that crispy goodness and enables the turkey to cook more evenly than as a whole bird; read about it here: Spatchcocked Turkey. Say What?

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If you’re thinking of frying a turkey for the first time, check out this recipe for a great set of instructions with a focus on safety: Found Recipe: Alton Brown’s Deep-Fried Turkey

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Savory Sides

For me, the side dishes are as important as the main course. We have our favorites; I’ve recently waxed poetic about our creamed corn: Best Creamed Corn Ever – Handed-Down and Upgraded Scratch Recipe from My Dad and Grandmother.

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233408Another recipe that uses corn is one that I found in a magazine: Food Magazine Treasures: Serrano Ham and Corn Pudding . This recipe is a little off the beaten path for holiday dinners, but if you’re in the Southwest, anything goes, chili pepper-wise. I sneak this dish onto our holiday table about every three years, and someone (usually the Grill-Meister) says. “why don’t we have this more often?”

And then there’s the squash.  I love all kinds of squash and am on a mission to get the Grill-Meister to tolerate it. A super-simple holiday side dish is here: Simple Autumn Side: Baked Acorn Squash.

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Or you can go the soup and salad route, with Creamy Butternut Squash Soup with a Hint of Cumin and Warm and Yummy First Course: Toasted Goat Cheese Salad .

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Butternut squash makes a creamy, comforting cool-weather soup
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Toasted Goat Cheese Salad is festive enough for a holiday meal

Brussels sprouts are in the “love ’em or hate ’em” category, but I’m definitely in the  “love ’em” camp. If you’re with me, try this stellar treatment: Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Cranberries, Bacon and Bacon-Jalapeño Jam.

Or if you are a sweet potato aficionado, how about this: Found Recipe – A New Holiday Sweet Potato Favorite.  These individual sweet potato goodies are a big hit, and straddle the savory / sweet taste market perfectly.fullsizeoutput_360

Another great savory side, and an alternative to the ubiquitous mashed potato, is our rosemary-roasted potatoes, AKA Simple Potatoes, Yummy Crunchy Goodness. 

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Rosemary-roasted potatoes are crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside

Breads

I just published the Mema Rolls recipe, finally! This is THE BOMB if you are in need of a homemade bread solution for your holiday meal.

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Last Call: Sweets

The Grill-Meister can also bake, and he made this marvelous pie from Southern Living a few years ago (I’m campaigning for it to appear again this year): Food Magazine Treasures: Salted-Caramel Chocolate Pecan Pie.

Salted Caramel-Chocolate Pecan Pie at Glover Gardens
This pie is every bit as delicious as it looks.

I’m not really a baker, but I make cookies during the holidays, mostly at my mother-in-law’s request. This is her favorite recipe: Raspberry-Nut Christmas Bars.

Our go-to favorite in the cookie department at any time of year is the Glover Gardens Comfort Cookies, a version of the Cowboy Cookie (just call it an Everything Cookie). I just made a huge batch for our Musical Millennial, who is home from college and had a passel of friends over…not a morsel was left.

December 28th is “Christmas”

Don’t feel too sorry for us for doing that restaurant outing on Christmas Day; we’ll get our millennials back on Dec. 28th and will have our big family celebration then. Some of these Glover Gardens classics will be on the menu, and if there’s anything new, we’ll be sure to share it.

Best Wishes

Peace, goodwill and happy holidays to you and yours, whatever joyous occasion you celebrate. Ours is Christmas.

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens

In the Christmas Mood! Holiday Tips from Colleagues include a Hot Chocolate Bar, a Board Game and Christmas Jazz

We’re in the Christmas mood here at Glover Gardens, and some of my colleagues have helped us get that way…

There was a hot chocolate bar at our work party last week, and my colleague who organized the party urged me to get there early and take pictures “for the blog”. Sweet!

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The bar was a great idea and we may do something similar here on the 28th when we have our family Christmas. The hot chocolate was in a big crock pot, and there were all kinds of goodies to drizzle, dollop or adorn the sweet, steaming goodness. (Not pictured – whipped cream!)

Beyond enjoying a meal and the hot chocolate together, our little work party during lunch one day last week was really fun! Calling it a “wamily” (work family), the crackerjack team of party planners had organized activities that made the event a wonderful bonding experience.   Our recreation during the celebration included decorating ornaments, a hilarious set of contests (I actually won the one in which you have one minute to draw a snowman on a paper plate on top of your head because the judge was impressed that I wrote “snowman” in cursive legibly) and playing board games together in small groups. One of my colleagues brought a new game, Codenames, and we were all instantly enamored. I ordered one right away for Glover Gardens, and Santa might have given a couple as gifts (shhhhhh!).

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Another colleague, knowing how we feel about jazz here at Glover Gardens, sent a text to me one evening with a link to the Jazz at Lincoln Center Big Band Holidays performance (led by Wynton Marsalis) on YouTube suggesting that my family would enjoy it. Love it!

This music will definitely put you in the Christmas mood.

Thanks to my colleagues for the great tips!

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens

 

Antipasto Advice from Mom and Great Tastes from the Texas Coast

I love it when folks reach out to me for advice about cooking and entertaining; it feeds my soul (pun intended).

It also gives me good topics for the blog and the impetus to pull together a post – from memory, experience or my own food mentors.

So, for the friend who asked for input on an antipasto tray she’s bringing to a party, here’s a special treat: advice from my Mom. She was an amazing cook and hostess and antipasto platters were a foundational appetizer for her parties.  I am so grateful for everything she taught me about entertaining and cooking.  If I’m guilty of ascribing to the “food is love” philosophy, it’s totally her fault.

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Mom and me in her kitchen at the beach / my childhood home, sometime in the mid-to-late 80s, enjoying a glass of wine together. There are so many memories locked up in those treasures all over that kitchen.

Mom has been cooking for the angels since September of 2000 and my Dad joined her in heaven this past summer, but they left me with a wonderful legacy: a cookbook they compiled of their favorite recipes, with additional entries collected from friends and family.  The Great Tastes from the Texas Coast cookbook project took place in the late 80s and was intended as give-away for clients at my Dad’s real estate office on the beach in Gilchrist, Texas. (Dad was a weekend realtor and a high-tech salesman for Motorola during the week.)

You know the kind of cookbook I’m talking about, paper-bound with a plastic binder, worn and torn, stained with use, stuffed with other recipes from family members on note cards and sticky notes that probably should have been in the cookbook (and probably would have been in the next version of Great Tastes from the Texas Coast if there was one).  Oh my gosh, I just got a great idea: that’s the name for my first cookbook, whenever I publish it.

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I didn’t realize at the time what a treasure Great Tastes from the Texas Coast would turn out to be, and now feel so blessed to have many of my parents’ recipes at my fingertips.  That’s my Mom’s drawing there on the front, too.  This bounty of family memories and codified parental cooking advice was the impetus for me to start on the Glover Gardens Cookbook (which eventually became the blog), so that our boys could have the same bounty of family recipes.

While Great Tastes from the Texas Coast is long on value through recipes and their associated memories, it is very, very short on words and and almost devoid of style (other than the cover art). Note Mom’s entry, Antipasto Ingredients, below.  No one could accuse her of being verbose or flowery.  This was serious business.

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But what Mom lacked in creative writing skills, she more than made up for in the cooking and entertaining department.  Here’s how she did the antipasto.

See the basket on the wall below, in the repeat of the kitchen picture? It was about 24 inches long, 15 inches wide and 3 inches deep, and was perfect for Mom’s antipasto treatment.  I loved that basket and think I might have inherited it, many moons ago.  It must have fallen apart, or I would still have it.  But I digress.  Mom lined that venerable old basket with plastic wrap and then covered the whole thing with overlapping red or green leaf lettuce, or both.  (Leaf lettuce is good for lining a platter, because it is easy to flatten.)

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After lining the basket, she stuffed it full with ingredients from her list, not neatly in little rows or stacks, but bunched together by type in a way that conveyed a sense of plenty and hospitality.  She was careful to distribute the colors – a pile of kalamata olives would never be next to anchovies, smoked mussels or marinated mushrooms because those colors would be too drab together.  You could almost see her artist’s mind working while she assembled, taking care to mix the textures, too:  the kalamatas would go much better next to bright red roasted and marinated peppers, which in turn would be nestled next to generous chunks of provolone with big, fat, garlic-stuffed green olives on one side and her garlicky, pink marinated shrimp on the other.  If there was a dip, it would be in a small ceramic bowl and garnished with parsley or dried herbs.  Bunches of sliced mortadella, ham and salami would be strategically placed opposite each other, perhaps next to glistening sun-dried tomatoes in olive oil, artichoke hearts or fresh, crunchy, pungent radishes.  Breadsticks might be vertical in a pretty glass or two, and whole green onions would cut a bright green horizontal swath across the top. Mom would then drizzle a bit of vinaigrette on her masterpiece where appropriate and call it done.

I wish I had a picture to share – words cannot do justice to the welcome and hospitality that Mom’s antipasto platter conveyed. However, I found a photo in the site Honestly Yum that gives me the same feeling.

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Photo from Honestly Yum’s post How to Create an Impressive Antipasti Spread

Mom left out a few of the items that I remember from her antipasto, so perhaps they came later: cornichons, grapes, halved cherry tomatoes, pepperdew peppers stuffed with bleu cheese, fresh vegetables like broccoli or cauliflower (although we are moving out of the antipasto neighborhood here and it might be controversial that French cornichons or bleu cheese would even be considered on this originally Italian spread).

If I was doing an antipasto platter, I’d probably add a couple of my go-to favorites, such as my super-easy treatment of grape tomatoes below that provides a composed, bite-sized, super-fresh yumminess.

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Antipasto Fresca (grape tomatoes with fresh mozzarella and oregano)

Or Belgian endive filled with something good.

Belgian Endive & Brie Appetizer
Belgian endive with brie, walnuts and grapes

And the picture below is from a smorgasbord night here at Glover Gardens, which on that night looked a bit like an antipasto platter, although heavy with crostini and bruschetta.  Gosh, I’m getting hungry!

Smorgasbord for Two by the Pool
Smorgasbord for Two by the Pool

And so, to my friend who requested some information about antipasto platters, I hope the advice from Mom with a little more info from me is useful for you.  Thanks for giving me a reason to spotlight Great Tastes from the Texas Gulf Coast and travel through the taste memories from Mom’s kitchen.

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook

Get Your Game Day Menu On!

I’m all excited about going to a Super Bowl Party at someone else’s house, which means I can concentrate on a dish or two instead of ten.

Score!

What are you going to do for Game Day food? From the archives of the Glover Gardens Cookbook, here are a few recommendations for your thoughtful consideration.  Here are a few great versions of obvious football party food choices, plus a couple you might not have contemplated.

A Creamy Dip is Pretty Much Required

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Creamy Jalapeno Dip, AKA Stephanie’s Green Dip – you just won’t believe how good this dip is.  Creamy, spicy, compliments a crisp, fresh, healthy veggie just as well as it does a satisfyingly salty chip – YUM!

Gotta Have Salsa

Glover Gardens Salsa

Glover Gardens Salsa, a perfect companion for Stephanie’s Green Dip – fresh, uncooked and spicy with a tang of vinegar.

What About a Shrimp or Three?

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Boiled shrimp with tangy remoulade – a break from all the saltiness and pork you’ll be consuming (if you’re anything like me!).

A Different Kind of Slider

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Chipotle Chicken Salad, which is great on rolls for a slider experience, on crackers, or even in a pita.  This is one of the dishes I’ll be bringing to my friend’s party, a repeat performance by request.

How About Grilling a Turkey Cevap?

Turkey Cevap Plated

If you’re firing up the grill and want to do something different, how about this Turkey Cevap on a pita?  With its bright and flavorful garnishes of mint, cilantro, jalapeño, onion, tomato and creamy avocado yogurt sauce, the cevap is almost one-a dish meal – all four major food groups are represented.

What About a Spicy Casserole?

Serrano Ham and Corn Pudding photo from Epicurious.

Serrano Ham and Corn Pudding is a spicy comfort food that serves as a terrific side dish and travels well. It is just as good at room temperature as it is hot, and can actually be finger food if you cut it into squares.  It can be served as-is, or with a variety of condiments:  sour cream, guacamole, queso, or even the green dip and salsa pictured above.  This is a great dish to bring to a party.

Gosh, That Looks Good!

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No recipes here, just gorgeous plating – I always need a reminder that we eat with our eyes.  My son and I were in Seattle during last year’s Super Bowl and did the pub food thing  for the game – yum!  I wonder how many pounds of chicken wings are consumed during the Super Bowl each year?

Our Plan

Our party contributions are going to be the Chipotle Chicken Salad shown above, and the Grill-Meister’s special sub sandwich  with German deli meats that he calls the U-Boat.  I’ll be sure to capture the recipe and share it here.  And you know, we made ourselves hungry digging through the Glover Gardens Cookbook archives, and have decided that we MUST HAVE the Turkey Cevap pictured above for dinner tonight.

If you are celebrating tomorrow’s great American sporting event, what are YOU making?

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook

Decadent Chocolate Orange Pots

We had a tiny dinner party last night and I took a chance by making a new dessert for the first time.  If you’ve stumbled onto my About page, you’ll know that I’m just not much of a sweets enthusiast.  But my risk-taking paid off and the Chocolate Orange Pots delighted the Grill-Meister and our guests, who gushed their appreciation:

This is the best thing I’ve tasted in a long, long time.

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Banner from Recipe Reminiscing blog

The recipe came to me by way of the Recipe Reminiscing blog.  The author, whose moniker is TidiousTed, is doing a public service by resurrecting the ghosts of culinary classics.  I found the recipe he posted for “Chocolate Orange Pots” when I was searching for interesting things to do with our just-harvested Glover Gardens orange crop.

I adjusted the recipe and made it my own, most notably using semi-sweet instead of plain chocolate and Cointreau instead of Curacao.  I had tasted the Curacao before using it – thank goodness! – and found it to be cloyingly sweet and not very orange-y.  The Cointreau has more of the slightly bitter tang of orange peel.

The recipe serves between 4 and 8 people, depending on how large you want the portions to be.  It is very rich, but the orange zest provides a great balance to the mouthfeel of the chocolate and cream.  We served shots of freshly squeezed orange juice alongside the dessert, and it was heavenly.  If you have a need for an impressive, decadent, and yet relatively easy dessert for a dinner party, this one will not disappoint.  Be sure and make it a few hours ahead of time so it can chill nicely.

Decadent Chocolate Orange Pots

Ingredients (serves 4 – 8)

  • 6 oz. semi-sweet chocolate, broken into pieces, plus 1 tsp. grated semi-sweet chocolate
  • rind of 1 small orange, finely grated
  • 3 eggs, separated and whisked lightly with a fork
  • 3 tbsp. Cointreau
  • 2 cups heavy cream, divided
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 2 tsp. granulated sugar
  • juice of 1 orange
  • orange rind spirals

Cooking Instructions

Melt the chocolate, either by stirring in a metal bowl over a pan of hot water, or by following the instructions on the package to melt in the microwave.  Let cool slightly (removing from the pan of water if you used that method).

Stir in the orange rind, egg yolks and Cointreau. Stir well and set aside.  Using a mixer, whip 1 cup of the cream until thick, then in a separate bowl, beat the egg whites until stiff. Fold the cream and egg whítes into the chocolate mixture.  Pour into custard cups and chill.

Beat the other cup of cream with vanilla and sugar until it forms soft peaks and spoon it onto the chocolate pots after they are well chilled.  Garnish with orange rind spirals and grated chocolate.

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Assembling the ingredients first makes it go so much quicker.  That’s the recipe from Recipe Reminiscing on my screen.
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I love how glossy chocolate looks when it is melted
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These were generous servings, but we were glad when we realized how good this is!
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Serving the shot of freshly squeezed orange juice with the chocolate was a hit.  Plus, it just looks cool, doesn’t it?

References:

 

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook

Tiny Dinner Party with International Guests

Diversity Hands - the World I Want to Live InThe Grill-Meister and I are both blessed to work in international environments, which fosters great relationships with colleagues from all over the world.  Sometimes we are able to lure them to Glover Gardens, such as tonight, when we are having a tiny dinner party with a couple from far across the globe.  It is so rewarding to learn about different cultures as we share our own.  One of our two guests tonight has never been to Texas, so we’re having a very traditional steak dinner.  The menu:

It is mid-morning right now and the table is set, so I’m about to get to work on the dessert.  I’m breaking Ina Garten’s (the Barefoot Contessa) rule of never making anything for the first time for a dinner party, but it is early enough in the day that I can do something different if I make a mess of it.

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The table is set – now we just need food, wine, music, flowers and our guests

We’re really looking forward to it!  And for a look at an entirely different type of international party here at Glover Gardens and a couple of cool wintertime recipes, check out Pot Luck Perfect: In-the-Moment Lentil Soup.  We had a houseful of colleagues this time last year and a rollicking good time when everyone brought a dish or drink to share.

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My European colleagues in the outdoor kitchen at Glover Gardens; they whipped up a marvelous vegetarian lentil soup

I’ll share the results of tonight’s meal, and wish you all a happy Saturday evening.

UPDATE:   the tiny dinner party was super-successful, and the dessert was rockin’!  Read about it here.  And I made a new friend!  Read the haiku about that here.

Copyright 2017, Glover Gardens Cookbook

Happy New Year!

It’s New Year’s Eve!  I’m looking forward to 2017 and all of the opportunities, challenges, connections and blessings it will bring.  And I have to acknowledge that one of the big opportunities and blessings for me in 2016 was sharing a few thoughts, recipes and haikus with you in this blog – and the interactions and connections that spawned.  Thank you!

There’s no time to create a compelling post at the moment – the Christmas tree’s undoing beckons!- so I will wish everyone a safe and happy celebration tonight, and simply repost a New Year’s Day Brunch menu from last year.

Pampas Grass Cocktail
The Pampas Grass is a very light sparkler to brighten up your New Year’s Eve or brunch

My recommended New Year’s Brunch Menu (which can also be a lovely New Year’s Eve menu if you’re having a party):

I got all into New Year’s traditions last year and wrote about the traditions that accompany it – click here if you’d like to read the full post.

Happy New Year!  And don’t forget to be safe.

 

Copyright 2016, Glover Gardens Cookbook

 

 

Rosemary Wreath Appetizer Platter

I was inspired to make a rosemary wreath by another blogger (see yesterday’s post) and it worked!  It is a lovely way to dress up the old standby party dish of cheese, salami and olives.  I decorated the wreath with marinated piquant Peppadew peppers, but cherry or grape tomatoes would work just as well.

Here’s how to do it.  You’ll need to have access to a large a rosemary plant.

Snip about 30 sprigs of rosemary, one inch long or less.  Remove the side sprigs so that each length of rosemary is only one stem.  Lay the longer sprigs in a circle on a round platter and secure with florist’s wire.  Tuck the shorter ones in around the circle to even out the wreath.

Ingredients

  • Rosemary wreath (see above)
  • 9 marinated cherry peppers, cut in half sideways
  • 1/2 cup pitted Kalamata olives
  • 8 oz. of your favorite white cheese, cut into cubes (I used Havarti dill)
  • 8 oz. sliced salami

Place a small container with toothpicks in the middle of the platter, then surround it with salami slices inside the wreath area.  Arrange the peppers in groups of three on the wreath to resemble holly berries, then add the cheese cubes to the wreath.  Scatter the Kalamata olives across the whole platter.

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Below is the original wreath from Home is Where the Boat is, shared by Sara from Last Night’s Feast.

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Did You Know…?

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Photo By Biozinc (Own work) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Sweet piquant peppers called Peppadew are originally from South Africa and were discovered in the early 1990s.  Peppadew is a trademarked name and the peppers can be a little hard to find.  Bon Appetite published a recipe with them a few years ago and got loads of letters from disgruntled readers looking to make their Pimento Mac & Cheese, so they followed up with the article Where to Buy the Elusive Peppadew.

Peppadew peppers resemble (but are not the same as) cherry peppers, which is another name for pimento peppers.  Pimentos resemble (but are not the same as) red bell peppers.

Any of these wonderful peppers can be used in this recipe.

 

Rosemary Wreath

This blogging thing is fun, especially the connections with other bloggers and the ideas they share and inspire.

One of the blogs I subscribe to is Last Night’s Feast, where blogger Sara occasionally makes a post called Pretty Things, a collection of unrelated links and pictures of, well, pretty things.  A rosemary wreath caught my eye on her November Pretty Things post.  The wreath is from a blog called Home is Where the Boat Is (doesn’t that sound inviting???)

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Rosemary Wreath photo from Home is Where the Boat Is, reposted in Last Night’s Feast

The herb section of Glover Gardens includes a gigantic rosemary bush and more of this lovely savory than we could use in a decade, so of course I have to try this wreath.  It’s on the menu for a party with our wine club tonight.  I’ll share some photos of the Glover Gardens version, with thanks to Sara from Last Night’s Feast for sharing this very pretty thing.


Update:  I tried this, and it worked!  Read all about it and get the recipe here.

Creamy Jalapeño Dip, AKA Stephanie’s Green Dip – Great for Game Day

My colleague and friend Stephanie makes the most marvelous dip, and we pester her to bring a batch to us at least monthly.  It’s ‘formal’ name is Creamy Jalapeño Dip, but we mostly refer to it as Green Dip.  And sometimes, Crack Dip (because it’s addictive).  It’s that good!

Stephanie brings a big ol’ batch of Green Dip to work with a couple of giant bags of tortilla chips and some veggie dippers, puts it all out in a common area, and backs away slowly: then we attack it like we’ve been starved for months.

Stephanie makes the Green Dip / Crack Dip with her son Josh, and together, they won the dip category of our Halloween Dips and Desserts competition at work, a bit of team-building fun we had together last month.  Our contest was patterned after the Food Network’s show Chopped, and yours truly was a judge.  Fun!

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The award-winning Green Dip in our Halloween Chopped-style competition

A self-described “Team Mom, Stephanie is generous with her time and her Green Dip, and has provided the recipe so that I can share it with all of you.  It is PERFECT for a post-Thanksgiving football weekend (add it to your tailgate party!), and great on a turkey sandwich.  In fact, there are tons of ways you can use this dip – see the list at the end of the post.

Stephanie was the food stylist for this post, providing the photo below.  I think she might need to be a guest blogger in the Glover Gardens Cookbook!

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The “official” photo for the Green Dip

Creamy Jalapeno Dip, AKA Stephanie’s Green Dip

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp mayonnaise
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/3 cup buttermilk
  • 1 1-oz. packet of ranch dressing mix
  • 1 small can diced green chilies (mild or hot, depending on your taste)
  • 2-4 fresh jalapenos (depends on pepper size and desired heat), cut into pieces; remove and save seeds and spines
  • 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves, pulled off of stems
  • Juice of 1 small lime
  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 2 pinches cumin

Cooking Instructions

Throw all ingredients in blender and mix until smooth.  Add jalapeno seeds and spines to increase heat as desired. Serve as an appetizer with chips or fresh veggies.

And there’s more…

The best thing about the Green Dip is using the leftovers.  It will keep for about 10 days in the fridge, which is good, because this recipe makes a large batch.  Since Stephanie started gifting us with this dip (including once as a get-well gift after a hospitalization), I have used it in various and delightful ways:

  • As a spread for a turkey sandwich, chicken breast sandwich, or just about any sandwich (think Green Dip BLT)
  • Whipped into leftover mashed potatoes for a whole new take on them
  • In scrambled eggs, before scrambling – a couple of tablespoons provides a creamy richness, and just the right bit of spice
  • Swirled into creamed corn
  • As a condiment on fish tacos, shrimp tacos, any tacos, fajitas
  • Tossed with chopped chicken breast and minced red onions for a quick chicken salad
  • As a dip for boiled shrimp in place of – or addition to – cocktail sauce or remoulade
  • As a salad dressing – it’s great with romaine and crisp, brightly colored bell peppers
  • As a base for a Southwest-style white pizza
  • In potato salad, as the creamy base
  • Swirled into or dolloped on top of a vegetable soup like my Creamy Butternut Squash Soup with a Hint of Cumin
  • As a spread for my Tuna or Salmon Burgers
  • In place of mayo, plain yogurt or sour cream in a variety of other uses

The final say…

There are tons of recipes for dips like this out there on the internet, but Stephanie’s is The BOMB.  It’s the only version of a creamy jalapeño dip I need, because she and her son Josh have fine-tuned this recipe over the years they’ve been making it.  Trust me on this.

Thank you, Stephanie!

Copyright 2016, Glover Gardens Cookbook